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Baby Teeth and Braces: Why Early Treatment May Be Best

November 29th, 2018

WHILE MANY THINK BRACES are for correcting misaligned adult teeth, you may be surprised to learn that orthodontics can help correct your child’s bite before their adult teeth even come in!

Baby Teeth Play an Important Role in Oral Health

Primary teeth—more commonly known as baby teeth—play a key role in your child’s oral health. Besides providing an aesthetic appeal to your child’s smile and boosting their self-esteem, primary teeth have three main functions:

  1. They aid in proper chewing, fostering good nutrition
  2. They promote proper speech development
  3. They reserve a space for permanent teeth to grow in

If a primary tooth falls out or must be removed before its time due to decay, the surrounding teeth may shift into the gap, causing dental crowding and future orthodontic problems.

Watch the video below

Dr. Adam Daniels explains when a good time to get your child evaluated

Seven Is the Perfect Age for an Orthodontic Visit

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children have an orthodontic exam at the earliest signs of any orthodontic issue, but no later than age seven. Although not every child will need treatment that young, some may benefit from early intervention.

Much of the treatment that takes place at this age is called Phase 1 orthodontic treatment, usually occurring when a child still has a mix of primary and permanent, secondary teeth. During this phase, we seek to correct any problems that may be occurring with jaw growth and even address certain bite issues. This phase is generally followed by a second phase of treatment when all of the child’s permanent teeth have erupted.

Beginning two phase treatment while your child still has primary teeth can have numerous benefits and can even reduce the time needed for a full set of braces.

Early Orthodontic Intervention Can Prevent Future Problems

Whether or not your child is showing signs of misaligned teeth, seven is the perfect age for them to come in for an orthodontic evaluation. Orthodontic treatment isn’t always necessary if there’s a space in your little one’s primary teeth or baby teeth, but we can help you determine the best plan for your child’s growing smile.

Thank you for trusting us with your family’s oral health! We love our patients!

~ Dr. Adam Daniels and the CVO Team

 

Image by Flickr user Loren Kerns used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Toothpaste Abrasiveness

July 19th, 2018

I see a lot of adults for consultations in our practice.  Many of them have gum recession, and some of them get sensitivity because too much of their root is exposed.  I usually hear “My dental hygienist tells me that I brush too hard.”  But the truth is, that isn’t always the case.

Did you know that the leading cause of gum recession isn’t brushing too hard? It is actually what you are putting on your toothbrush!  Toothpaste has a variety of ingredients.  Some of them help it taste better, some of them let it form that gel look, so it isn’t runny like water, and some of the ingredients help it get particles stuck to your teeth off.  The part of the toothpaste that helps you cleanse your teeth is a light abrasive (almost like sandpaper).  The stronger the abrasive ingredient, the more it scrubs your teeth – AND your gums away.

Toothpaste companies have gotten clever lately and know that everyone wants white teeth – they call their toothpastes all sort of cute names like “Bright White” and “Ultra-Whitening”.  What they do to make these claims is actually just put a stronger abrasive unit in the toothpaste. This abrasive unit actually causes gum recession and sensitivity to your teeth.  Put that on top of someone who had thin gums and bone from not receiving proper orthodontic care as a young child and you have a recipe for major gum recession.

Check out this chart below.  If your toothpaste has an abrasivity index over 70 – it could be destroying your gums.  Consider switching to one that has a milder abrasivity index score (under 70).  This could not only save your gums but save your pocketbook thousands of dollars in unnecessary dental work and gum surgery later on!

~ Dr. Adam Daniels

If unable to view the image below please follow this link:

https://www.ctvalleyortho.com/what-s-new

 

What Is a Frenectomy?

June 25th, 2018

HAVE YOU EVER HEARD of a person being “tongue-tied” or “lip-tied”? Dr. Daniels and Dr. Rola care about the health of your mouth as a whole, not just your teeth. When a tongue or lip-tie is present, some problems may arise that we can help with!

Why Do Lip And Tongue-Ties Occur?

A lip or tongue-tie occurs when a thin tissue in the mouth called a frenum is overgrown. There are two kinds of frena in the mouth, labial (lip) frena and the lingual (tongue) frenum. The labial frena can be found in the center of the lips, connecting the inside of your upper and lower lips to the gum tissue. You can see the tongue frenum by looking in the mirror and lifting your tongue up to touch the roof of your mouth.

The purpose of the frenum is to limit certain muscle movements to prevent tissue damage. When the frenum tissue is excessive, however, it has the potential to do more harm than good.

What Problems Can Arise As The Result Of A Tongue-Tie?

A tongue-tie restricts the tongue and prevents it from moving freely. Tongue-ties may be moderate, resulting in only small inconveniences like not being able to lick an ice cream cone. In some cases, however, they cause severe impairments such as:

  • Difficulty nursing as an infant and eating later in life
  • Speech impediments
  • Pain and discomfort
  • Periodontal issues, such as receding gums
  • Tongue thrust and bite misalignment

What Issues Can A Lip-Tie Cause?

A lip-tie refers to a frenum that attaches too far down on the gum. The possible complications of a lip-tie are somewhat similar to those who are tongue-tied. An overgrown labial frenum can:

  • Cause pain and discomfort
  • Make it difficult for children to keep their teeth clean
  • Complicate nursing
  • Lead to periodontal issues, such as receding gums
  • Result in misaligned teeth and bite (usually gap teeth)

A Frenectomy Helps Alleviate Tongue and Lip-Ties

A frenectomy is a simple procedure that can be performed by dental professionals where excess tissue on the frenum is removed. Before performing a frenectomy, several factors are taken into account, including the possibility that the condition may correct itself over time.

We’re Here To Answer Your Questions

If you’re concerned about a possible lip-tie or tongue-tie in yourself or your child, schedule an appointment with us today. We’d be more than happy to answer your questions and together, we’ll determine the best way to move forward!

Thank you for trusting us with your oral health concerns!

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

~ Natasha

Summer Vacation is almost here! Follow these simple tips...

June 1st, 2018

If you are wearing braces and are planning a vacation, Dr. Adam Daniels, Dr. Rola Alkhatib and the CVO team have put together a list of items that will be handy to have with you at all times while you are out of town.

Putting the following items together in a kit keeps everything in one place and easily accessible:

  • Toothpick, flosspick, or other interdental cleaners
  • Floss
  • Travel toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • A water bottle or a mini bottle of mouth rinse
  • Orthodontic wax to help with discomfort from protruding wires, brackets or attachments
  • A small mirror for examining any possible issues in your mouth

Just a reminder:   if your vacation destination includes a flight, make sure they are travel-sized containers that are 3.4 ounces (100 milliliters) or less per item.

If you happen to be on vacation and experience problems, contact us and we may be able to talk you through it until your return.  Otherwise, we may suggest going online and searching for orthodontic practices in your area. Most orthodontists will lend a helping hand to another orthodontic patient and get him or her out of pain or discomfort.

We also suggest avoiding the following foods to prevent broken brackets and/or wire distortion while you are on vacation:

  • Chewy, sticky, or gummy food
  • Apples, pears, and other whole fruits (cut fruit into wedges before consuming)
  • Bagels, hard rolls and pizza crust
  • Corn on the cob
  • Hard candies
  • Hard cookies or pretzels
  • All varieties of nuts, including peanuts, almonds, and cashews

If you are wearing clear aligners, in addition to the recommended kit above, bring your previous aligner and/or next aligner with you.  If you happen to lose your current aligner, don’t worry! Simply put in the previous one or the next one if it fits and contact us as soon as you get home!  If you need an extra retainer case, just let us know, we'll be happy to provide one for you.

Follow these tips and you can have a worry-free vacation! Please give us a call if you have any questions!

Melanie